Drinking Water Quality

WHAT IS THE QUALITY OF MY DRINKING WATER?

The water the City of Dayton delivers to our customers meets all current regulatory requirements. We analyze more than 200 samples daily to check for bacteria and other potential contaminants. The water is continuously monitored at the treatment plants and within the distribution system. To further ensure quality water, we collect samples from production wells, water treatment plants, water reservoirs, and the distribution system.  The water quality details we report to the Ohio EPA can be found here: Water Quality | Dayton, OH (daytonohio.gov)

We work closely with regulatory agencies to stay abreast of newly identified contaminants and potential regulations. To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, both the Ohio EPA and the U.S. EPA limit certain contaminant levels in water provided by public water systems. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be found on the U.S. EPA’s Safe Drinking Water page at Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) | US EPA.

On March 14, 2023, U.S. EPA released a proposed more stringent Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 4 parts per trillion (ppt) for PFOA and PFOS in public water systems. An MCL is the legal limit on the amount of a substance that is allowed under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. Dayton will have three years to meet the MCL once it is finalized and we are already planning, designing, and constructing new projects.

For more information on the PFAS MCL visit, Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) | US EPA.

If you have questions about your water and its potential effect on your health, we  encourage you to consult the U.S. EPA’s fact sheet, Questions and Answers: Drinking Water Health Advisories for PFOA, PFOS, GenX Chemicals and PFBS | US EPA and Ohio EPA’s page PFAS in Drinking Water | Ohio Environmental Protection Agency

This chart shows provides the levels of PFOA and PFOS compounds in the drinking water produced at our plants.

Line graph showing PFAS results in parts per trillion for the Ottawa Water Treatment Plant